Acoustic Rhinometry in the Evaluation of Nasal Obstruction

Laryngoscope, 1995 Authors: R. Roithmann, P. Cole, J. Chapnik, I. Shpirer, V. Hoffstein, N. Zamel Conclusion: “From a clinical point of view, the area-distance function curve [acoustic rhinometry] helps the clinician to differentiate objectively and quantify the mucosal and the structural component of nasal obstruction and to assess results of medical and/or surgical treatment. AR…

Acoustic Rhinometry Compared with Anterior Rhinomanometry in the Assessment of the Response to Nasal Allergen Challenge

Clinical Otolaryngology, 1994 Authors: G. K. Scadding, Y. C. Darby, and C. E. Austin Conclusion: “Acoustic rhinometry has a definite advantage [to rhinomanometry] because it is not dependent on airflow in the nose, and it is therefore suitable for severely congested individuals. It also appears to be more sensitive to changes in obstruction, probably because…

The Use of Acoustic Rhinometry to Quantitatively Assess Changes after Intranasal Allergen Challenge

American Journal of Rhinology, 1994 Authors: V. W. S. Lai, J. P. Corey Conclusion: “Acoustic Rhinometry is a reliable technique for assessing the results of nasal provocation. This is a simple test to perform and is a good objective evaluation of the degree of nasal patency. Results are obtained quickly and consistently and are highly…

Septoplasty and Compensatory Inferior Turbinate Hypertrophy: A Randomized Study Evaluated by Acoustic Rhinometry

The Journal of Laryngology and Otology, 1993 Authors: L.F. Grymer, P. Illum, O. Hilberg Conclusion: “Septoplasty increased the areas of the narrow side significantly in both groups. The increase in area in group B was surprisingly little. This is probably an expression of the limitation of septoplasty in the treatment of slight septal deviations. The…

The Role of Acoustic Rhinometry in Studying the Nasal Cycle

Rhinology, 1993 Authors: E. W. Fisher, G. K. Scadding, V. J. Lund Conclusion: “Magnetic resonance Imaging is one way of expanding the sphere of study to the whole nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses, although it is prohibitively expensive for large scale studies. Acoustic rhinometry does not provide as extensive geometric information as MRI, but allow…

Acoustic Rhinometry: A diagnostic Tool for Patients with Chronic Rhonchopathies

Rhinology, 1992 Authors: H. Lenders and W. Pirsig Conclusion: “Acoustic rhinometry is a quick, non-invasive and objective method to measure the cross-sectional areas and volumes of the nasal cavities.” “Clinically recognizable irregular movements of the soft palate in rhonchopaths can be visualized by AR in 94% of all patients.” “This study shows that AR helps…

Acoustic Rhinometry: Values from Adults with Subjective Normal Nasal Patency

Rhinology, 1991 Authors: L. F. Grymer, O. Hilberg, O. F. Pedersen, and T. R. Rasmussen Conclusion: “The cross-sectional area of the nasal cavity increases in antero- posterior direction.” “The minimal cross-sectional area (MCA) is located in the anterior part of the nose, in some individuals probably at the head of the inferior turbinate, and after…

Acoustic Rhinometry: Evaluation of Nasal Cavity Geometry by Acoustic Reflection

Journal of Applied Physiology, 1989 Authors: O. Hilberg, A. C. Jackson, D. L. Swift, and O. F. Pedersen Conclusion: “The clinical cases in this study are examples of the applicability of acoustic reflection measurements in the nose. Tumors in the nasal cavity and the epipharynx can be diagnosed, and the treatment can be monitored in…

Acoustic Rhinometry: Evaluation of the Nasal Cavity with Septal Deviations, Before and After Septoplasty

Laryngoscope, 1989 Authors: L. F. Grymer, O. Hilberg, O. Elbrond, O. F. Pedersen Conclusion: “Acoustic rhinometry seems very suitable for evaluation of the nasal cavity in cases where septoplasty and turbinoplasty is considered, as well as for the postoperative evaluation. It provides an objective documentation of the visual impression of the nasal cavity, quantitative evaluation,…