Acoustic Rhinometry Reliability

Sleep Apnea Research Group Principal Investigator: Edward M. Weaver, MD, MPH Co-Investigators: Judy Stenstrom LPN, BA This study confirms the inter-rater and test-retest reliabilities of minimum cross-sectional area measurements of the nasal airway using acoustic rhinometry. Methods – Two separate examiners measured minimum cross-sectional area with acoustic rhinometry on 25 normal volunteers on three consecutive…

Comparison of Anatomic, Physiologic, and Subjective Measures of the Nasal Airway

Sleep Apnea Research Group Principal Investigator: Derek J. Lam, MD Co-Principal Investigator: Edward M. Weaver, MD, MPH Co-Investigators: Kathryn T. James, PA, MPH American Journal of Rhinology (in press) Background – Studies comparing different categories of nasal measures have reported inconsistent results. We sought to compare validated measures of the nasal airway: anatomic (acoustic rhinometry),…

Confirming Nasal Airway Patency Observed on Panoramic and Posterior-Anterior Cephalometric Radiographs Using an Acoustic Rhinometer

(Accepted for Publication, 11/23/2009) Authors: Jorge Landa, Alfred Rich, and Matthew Finkelman Conclusion: “A very strong correlation was found between the anterior nasal cross-sectional area calculated from the radiographs, and the anterior nasal cross-sectional area and nasal volume from the rhinometer. “The acoustic rhinometer can be a very instrumental and reliable adjunct during the course…

Nasal Cavity Geometry of Healthy Adults Assessed Using Acoustic Rhinometry

Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, 2008 Authors: A. de Oliveira Camargo Gomes, A. C. Martins Sampaio-Teixeira, S. H. Kiemle Trinadade, I. E. Kiemle Trinadade Conclusion: “This study used acoustic rhinometry to determine the reference values for nasal cross-sectional areas to be used, for comparison purposes, in the analysis of adults with functional and/or anatomical nasal obstruction.…

Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy

The Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society , 2008 Authors: Terri E. Weaver and Ronald R. Grunstein Relevance: “There is emerging evidence that increased nasal resistance affects CPAP use and initial acceptance of this treatment. Using acoustic rhinometry to measure the internal dimensions of the airway, those patients with smaller nasal cross-sectional area and reduced…

Anatomic Correlates of Acoustic Rhinometry as Measured by Rigid Nasal Endoscopy

Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, 1999 Authors: J. P. Corey, V. P. Nalbone, B. A. Ng Conclusion: “Acoustic Rhinometry (AR) evaluates the cross-sectional areas and volume of the nasal cavity through acoustic reflections. Successive valleys displayed on an AR graph are believed to correspond to anatomic landmarks. To assess the anatomic accuracy of AR, we performed…

Detection of the Nasal Cycle with Acoustic Rhinometry: Techniques and Applications

Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, 1999 Authors: A. Gungor, R. Moinuddin, R. H. Nelson, and J. P. Corey Conclusion: “Acoustic rhinometry is an appropriate method for detecting and recording the nasal cycle in normal subjects in terms of the cross- sectional areas and volume of the nasal cavity.” “When AR is used to evaluate volume changes…

Normative Standards for Nasal Cross-sectional Areas by Race as Measured by Acoustic Rhinometry

Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, 1998 Authors: J. P. Corey, A. Gungor, R. Nelson, X. Liu, and J. Fredberg Conclusion: “The importance of our data is that racial differences in nasal geometry can be demonstrated by AR. Because of these differences in nasal dimensions, “normal values” for nasal volumes and cross-sectional areas should be calculated according…

Nasal Cavity Geometry Measured by Acoustic Rhinometry and Computed Tomography

Archives of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, 1997 Authors: L. Gilain, MD, A. Coste, MD, F. Ricolfi, MD, E. Dahan, MD. Marliac, MD, R. Peynegre, MD, A. Harf, MD, B. Louis, PhD Conclusion: “Acoustic rhinometry may be particularly well suited to the evaluation of anterior nasal geometry during clinical studies. In conclusion, this study comparing in…

Nasal Airway dimensions in Term Neonates Measured by Continuous Wide-band Noise Acoustic Rhinometry

Acta Otolaryngolica, 1997 Authors: P. G. Djupesland and B. Lyholm Conclusion: “The results presented in this study, confirming those from previous studies (11, 13), further emphasize the potentials and advantages of the acoustic reflection technique as an investigative tool in studies of respiratory dynamics in infants. The examination takes only seconds to perform, is non-invasive,…

The Nasal Valve and Current Technology

American Journal of Rhinology, 1996 Authors: P. Cole and R. Roithmann Conclusion: “Although it is an invaluable diagnostic technique, imaging is not employed for assessment of nasal patency, but both rhinomanometry and acoustic rhinometry are widely used for this purpose. The latter two techniques are sensitive and objective, and they provide complementary information on patency…

The Role of Acoustic Rhinometry in Studying the Nasal Cycle

Rhinology, 1993 Authors: E. W. Fisher, G. K. Scadding, V. J. Lund Conclusion: “Magnetic resonance Imaging is one way of expanding the sphere of study to the whole nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses, although it is prohibitively expensive for large scale studies. Acoustic rhinometry does not provide as extensive geometric information as MRI, but allow…

Acoustic Rhinometry: Values from Adults with Subjective Normal Nasal Patency

Rhinology, 1991 Authors: L. F. Grymer, O. Hilberg, O. F. Pedersen, and T. R. Rasmussen Conclusion: “The cross-sectional area of the nasal cavity increases in antero- posterior direction.” “The minimal cross-sectional area (MCA) is located in the anterior part of the nose, in some individuals probably at the head of the inferior turbinate, and after…